Amina

Writing a memoir, especially one that includes exploration of the dark side of everything, including God, is hard work. It makes me want to go to analysis because I have begun to see much I haven’t see before. Stuff I didn’t even know existed. Amina is one.

Loren Pedersen writes, “the more in touch with the inner feminine a man is, the more comfortable he is likely to be with inner self-exploration. The anima, as a potential connection to his unconscious, may appear personified in his dreams and fantasies.”

When I picked up his book Dark Hearts, one that was leant to me, I had little interest. That was at the beginning of August. I am now the proud owner of the book and reading it at the fast clip of about two pages a day. No meat here. Hah!

Curiosity

James Hillman writes in Insearch: psychology and religion, “The ego, with its light attempts to ferret out causes in hidden recesses of the personality, searches for detailed childhood memories, promotes sweet sessions of silent introspection.

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Telling

Judith Barrington in her classic book Writing the Memoir writes, “Do not make the mistake of thinking it is easier to tell the stories you have lived than to make up fictitious stories about imaginary people.”

From my experience, I would add that going through the agonies and ecstasies of what I have lived prepares my fiction.  It adds a light and darkness to my imagination that I didn’t see before. This hasn’t yet developed into a story with a beginning and an end, but even with truth I am only just beginning.

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