Amina

Writing a memoir, especially one that includes exploration of the dark side of everything, including God, is hard work. It makes me want to go to analysis because I have begun to see much I haven’t see before. Stuff I didn’t even know existed. Amina is one.

Loren Pedersen writes, “the more in touch with the inner feminine a man is, the more comfortable he is likely to be with inner self-exploration. The anima, as a potential connection to his unconscious, may appear personified in his dreams and fantasies.”

When I picked up his book Dark Hearts, one that was leant to me, I had little interest. That was at the beginning of August. I am now the proud owner of the book and reading it at the fast clip of about two pages a day. No meat here. Hah!

Reality Can Kill Us

Friedrich Nietzsche writes, “We have art so that we shall not die of reality.”

I don’t think of Nietzsche as being the most positive guy I never met, but I like this quote. Since he is dead, I have to think I have changed and not him. Or he actually had a moment of bliss.

I take him to mean that art is as much an outlet as an escape; for the artist and the patron. What say you?

Advantage Bob?

Tor House is the name Robinson and Una Jeffers gave the house they built in Carmel, California. Tor comes from the rocky points they saw when visiting Dartmoor, England.  The home was important to his poetry. My house is important to my writing. There our similarities end.

He built his house. I live in mine. They built theirs with stone carved from the boulders of the coastline in Carmel. Someone built ours a long time ago and then more recently someone else put aluminum siding on it. I don’t even have to paint it and yet I feel ownership. Just by being present.

Robinson did all that work on his home and still had time to write. Very little of my home competes for my writing time. I think, “advantage Bob.” An advantage I have yet to capitalize on.  Maybe I should build a shed or something.

An Edge in the Prophetic

In “On Art”, an essay by Edward O. Wilson in the anthology Biopoetics, Wilsowrites, “I emphasize the expansive role of poetry to argue that whereas art and science are basically different in execution, they are convergent in what they might eventually disclose about human nature.”

How does that happen? Does it happen? What do they disclose about human nature?

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Things I’ve Seen

Rattlesnake plant and then a snake, I would be right along side your grandmother. Probably a head of her.

New Hampshire Garden Solutions

1. Larch Cone

Behind every stone, on every branch and in every puddle, beauty can be found. This tiny new larch cone (Larix laricina) is to me as beautiful as any flower.

2. Lilac Buds

Since I was just a boy one of my favorite things about spring has been watching lilac buds swell and finally open. It’s a simple thing, but for me it’s part of the magic of life that makes it so worth living.

3. Trapped Solomon's Seal

Does an emerging plant make a hole in one of last year’s leaves, or is the hole already there and the plant grows up through it? These are questions that came to mind as I sat pondering how every one of this Solomon seal’s leaves (Polygonatum biflorum) got trapped by a hole in a leaf. Will the plant be able to break free of the leaf and live as it was meant to, or will…

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It Doesn’t Mean Anything

Sometime ago I bought the book A Course in Miracles. A friend of mine had told me about it and upon first picking it up, it did not take, but now it is growing on me.

In addition to the course itself, there is also a workbook. Each exercise is to be taken alone for the day. There is one for every day of the year. The first one is to identify everything in sight with “it doesn’t mean anything.”  Continue reading

“Making Special”

Ellen Dissanayake, an Independent Scholar living in Seattle, has an essay in the book Biopoetics that addresses “making special.” She sees making special as an “undescribed human universal and the core of a behavior of art.”

She argues that this is a characteristic that lends to making art evolutionary. No other species makes art for this reason. In other species, art is connected to attracting a mate or playing a game as a means to survival.  Ellen proposes that human production of art is often for these reasons and something more, something special.

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