Theme for Our Church This Week is Blessings

A Prayer

The blessings, the beatitudes of Jesus. God bless those who become blessings. You await our blessings.

Blessings to you for earth, sky and sea. Blessings for those who have saved rather than squandered.  Blessings for those In need.  Blessings for those who loved. Blessings for those who Have turned from judging, who chose not to hate.

Love, with all its blessings, let that be us. Let that be here. Amen

Office Heroics

The last sentence in David Brook’s August 28 column reads, ” It’s possible to be heroic if you’re just sitting alone in your office. It just doesn’t make for a good movie.”

I don’t look like George Clooney, so the heck with the movie. I am going to accept this as good news.

 

Amina

Writing a memoir, especially one that includes exploration of the dark side of everything, including God, is hard work. It makes me want to go to analysis because I have begun to see much I haven’t see before. Stuff I didn’t even know existed. Amina is one.

Loren Pedersen writes, “the more in touch with the inner feminine a man is, the more comfortable he is likely to be with inner self-exploration. The anima, as a potential connection to his unconscious, may appear personified in his dreams and fantasies.”

When I picked up his book Dark Hearts, one that was leant to me, I had little interest. That was at the beginning of August. I am now the proud owner of the book and reading it at the fast clip of about two pages a day. No meat here. Hah!

“He Had The Wrong Dreams.”

“All wrong.” Biff then added in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. “The man didn’t know who he was.”

I can identity. Can you?

My quest is to unearth my dark side and my angst is serving me.

Some mornings I feel like my walk is over and other mornings I am just beginning.

I need to be Harry and to have Hermine, characters in Hermann Hesse’s Steppenwolf.

Oh wait, I think my life’s partner was Hermine in an earlier life. Was I Harry?

 

 

Snoring Sully Sullenberger

In the AARP Bulletin, of which I am old enough to read, there is a conversation with Sully Sullenberger, the pilot who five years ago safely landed a jet on the Hudson River saving 155 passengers and crew.

Among his many experiences since, Sully was invited to Obama’s first inaugural ball. After being introduced to Obama, the President turned to Sully’s wife and said,”America considers him a hero.”

And Sully’s wife Lorrie said, “Well, the world may think him a hero, but he still snores!”

And that is what makes heroes real.

Oscar Who?

Oscar Levant said to George Gershwin, “Tell me George, if you had to do it all over again, would you fall in love with yourself?”

It must feel good. Who am I kidding, it does feel good. Don’t all of us fall in love with ourselves at least once?

When does this become  a bad thing? Ever? I suspect if done in excess it would be a problem. A constant demonstration of it and we would appear selfish. When is confidence self love? Can we be confident without falling in love with ourselves?

At least with Gershwin, the result is that most of us know who he is. But who is Oscar Levant?

Getting Ready for Dr. Peter Quigley

Dr. Quigley in his book Housing the Environmental Imagination, quotes Thoreau, “We are wont to see our dooryard as a part of the earth’s surface.”

I surely do, it is why I offer up so many photos of the view from my office. I used to think that my dooryard could be anywhere. My first apartment was as a studio.. I knew from the get go that it wasn’t large enough. I needed more than a dorm room.

The good news is the studio had a huge balcony on which I could grill. I had learned from a friend known as the “food scientist” that eating like a king at breakfast and a pauper at night could enable me to lose weight.

First thing in the morning, I grilled either pork chops, lamb chops or steak and added it to three eggs, bacon and toast. I surely made my dooryard as part of the earth’s surface just by the animals I brought there albeit they had already been butchered.  I don’t remember if I lost weight.

Not sure I can tell that story with any success when I meet Dr. Quigley for dinner next week, but I surely enjoyed the memory his book provided.