Oscar Who?

Oscar Levant said to George Gershwin, “Tell me George, if you had to do it all over again, would you fall in love with yourself?”

It must feel good. Who am I kidding, it does feel good. Don’t all of us fall in love with ourselves at least once?

When does this become  a bad thing? Ever? I suspect if done in excess it would be a problem. A constant demonstration of it and we would appear selfish. When is confidence self love? Can we be confident without falling in love with ourselves?

At least with Gershwin, the result is that most of us know who he is. But who is Oscar Levant?

The Place In-between

James Hillman writes, “The place that analysis and theology have in common is the soul. But the soul is a ‘non-place’ for neither theology or dynamic psychotherapy regards it as its main concern. The one studies God and God’s intentions, the other studies men and women’s motivations, while the place in-between is too often left unoccupied.”

From Hillman’s book Insearch:psychology and religion.

In the Monadnock area of New Hampshire, we have group called Monadnock Area Psychotherapist Services (MAPS). They are a group of psychotherapists whose aim is to include in their therapy practice the place in-between.

How appealing is that to you? Do you feel an in-between place?

 

Naps

Waking up from a nap, I tried to remember a time when I didn’t take naps. When I worked in business I took naps.

Mostly when I traveled. Flying United Airlines provided a fabulous time to take a nap. I didn’t need a long one, twenty minutes did it. It still does it.

Whatever life I have in the present always seems so normal. Life like its always been.

For example, I am confident I never lived without an iPad or iPhone. Well, that may change now.

I plan to get a Fire Phone from Amazon. It depends only on AT&T. The last time they were the “provider” they couldn’t provide coverage where we live.

Important now that we no longer have a land line. Did we ever?

I wonder if in ten years the younger crowd will any more know what a land line is than they will a group called The Supremes. You know them, right?

Speaking of Arts

From the book Insearch: psychology and religion by James Hillman

“A solution that keeps the intentionality of consciousness yet forgoes its active thrust has been called the art of listening. This art has perhaps fallen into decline along with that of conversation.”

The Kindle edition I am reading was last updated in 1994. Bringing the statement forward and making it as if written in 2014 I ask, “Do you think”

A projection of sort. In 1994 I listened little. Today I feel I do more, but not enough. Still, as I project onto the world my own failings, I claim progress.

Can the world claim the same, even if a little? I think not.

Conversation on a public stage is in remission. My readings tell me that humans do worse in groups. Whatever darkness we have individually are disproportionally multiplied when ever two or more gather as one.

I propose we make listening a graduate degree. I bet those who earn it will become more valuable to corporations than lawyers.

Advantage Bob?

Tor House is the name Robinson and Una Jeffers gave the house they built in Carmel, California. Tor comes from the rocky points they saw when visiting Dartmoor, England.  The home was important to his poetry. My house is important to my writing. There our similarities end.

He built his house. I live in mine. They built theirs with stone carved from the boulders of the coastline in Carmel. Someone built ours a long time ago and then more recently someone else put aluminum siding on it. I don’t even have to paint it and yet I feel ownership. Just by being present.

Robinson did all that work on his home and still had time to write. Very little of my home competes for my writing time. I think, “advantage Bob.” An advantage I have yet to capitalize on.  Maybe I should build a shed or something.

Houses

In his book Housing the Environmental Imagination, Dr. Peter Quigley writes, ” By being the most prominent extension of the imaginative into the physical realm, houses are full of communication: they are political statements, social commentary, as well as embodied aesthetic projects.”

Yesterday The Boston Globe  published a picture of Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen’s house that just sold in California as well as the new one being built in Massachusetts.  The “old one” was a huge house, over eighteen thousand square feet. New one is down sized. Looks to be only about ten thousand square feet. Statement lost per square foot?

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Follow Your Dream Ponderings

I once was taught that the mindset of following one’s dream is a good way to go broke.  I know many close to me who would ask ( and not necessarily complimentary) when have I not followed my dream.

There is truth in this, but I kind of did it half heartedly. I think I looked for ways to have fun, but anything deeper was not a requirement. I dared not to dream. Not really.

I am fascinated with people who as part of their dream fought for a cause. My latest fascination continues to be Robinson Jeffers.

Dr. Peter Quigley in his book Housing the Environmental Imagination writes, “Five years after moving to Carmel, California in 1919, Jeffers bought 16 lots for $200 apiece, eventually owning 36 lots, none with a purchase price any higher than $3,000.” This over a ten year span.

Jeffers’s son Donnan reported that in 1977 these lots had a value of $200,000. We can only imagine what Jeffers’s dream is worth today. “Dreams, a good way to go broke.” Can I blame it on my mother?