Dickinson Forest / Muster Field

fictionfitz:

A place that beckons. One of these days….

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Sign

I have helpers that readers of this blog don’t ever hear from and who I don’t thank enough. They send me corrections when I’ve misidentified plants, reveal the names of plants that I don’t know, and pass along tips about places that might be worth a visit. One of the places mentioned recently was Dickinson Memorial Forest in Swanzey, which was once owned by a prominent local family. Since I’d heard of it but had never been I decided to visit.

2. Gate Posts

When you’ve reached this point you have a choice to make; you can turn right and follow the trail into the forest or you can follow this old road into Muster Field, so named because volunteer firemen used to muster and train here. I followed both but my first choice was through these old gate posts.

3. Road

I chose the old road because it follows the Ashuelot River which is…

View original 1,191 more words

Things I’ve Seen

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Tachinid Fly

I saw a fly on a milkweed leaf and he was open to posing, so here he is. I think he’s a tachinid fly because of his bristly abdomen. Some of these flies can be very helpful in the garden, controlling squash bugs and stinkbugs. Others aren’t so helpful, and parasitize moths and butterflies, including monarchs. This one was a little lumpy up around the shoulders and looked like it had been parasitized too.

2. Female Red Winged Blackbird

As I seem to do every year I stumbled into a red winged blackbird nesting site recently. The female shown here flew off half way across a pond to sit on a cattail and wait for me to leave while the male hovered above my head screeching at me. The same thing happened last year so I’ve learned that male red winged blackbirds can get angry very quickly, and they don’t easily back down when you’re…

View original 847 more words

More Mid May Flowers

fictionfitz:

always good, welcome to spring NH

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Johnny Jump Ups

Cheery little Johnny jump ups (Viola cornuta) have done just that; it seems like one day they weren’t there and the next day they were. The unusual spring heat is causing some plants to bloom two weeks or more ahead of when they normally do and it has been hard to keep up with them.

2. Painted Trillium

I was surprised to see a painted trillium (Trillium undulatum) already past its prime. You can see how the bright white has gone out of the petals and how they have become translucent. These are sure signs of age even though it should be just starting to bloom. Each white petal has a pink V at its base and that’s how it comes by its common name. Painted trilliums grow north to Ontario and south to northern Georgia. They also travel west to Michigan and east to Nova Scotia. I hope…

View original 1,442 more words

Into the Land of Ice and Stone

fictionfitz:

It is where I live.

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Trail

If you’re tired of all things winter then this post isn’t for you because it’s about being in a freezer of sorts; a man made canyon blasted out of solid rock where seeping groundwater freezes into icicles that grow to the height and diameter of tree trunks. I visited this place last week because I thought that, since this was just about the coldest February that we had ever seen, I’d be able to see some big ice. I wasn’t disappointed.

2. Green Ice

I think this is the biggest “icicle” that I’ve ever seen. It had to have been 15-20 feet out from the rock face and 40-50 feet tall. It is the sweetheart of the ice climbers who come here and, if you look carefully at the very top of the photo, you can see the legs of two ice climbers dressed in blue who were tying off their ropes, preparing to…

View original 728 more words

Bird Feeder…

fictionfitz:

Hadden’ s haven

Originally posted on John Hadden Photography:

The barred owl came to visit again! The barred owl came to visit again!

Our pal the barred owl was back yesterday afternoon, making himself (herself?) very comfortable on the top of our feeder stand for a good two hours. He seemed to be most interested in the goings on right below the feeder, no doubt waiting for a juicy mouse or other rodent to make its appearance. At times it looked like he was napping. Interestingly, none of the little birds seemed to mind too much that he was there, as the chickadees, titmice, nuthatches, and even cardinals happily munched at our other feeders just a few feet away from the owl.

Nikon D600, Sigma 120-400mm lens @ 330mm, ISO 1250, f/5.6, 1/200″ exposure.

View original

Friday Fictioneers: Life Cycle

fictionfitz:

Great picture Irene, writing too.

Originally posted on Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist):

© © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

“Children can’t come in.” The woman in uniform crossed her arms as she barred the entrance. 

“But Matron, we’ve driven over a hundred miles to  see the baby.”

“You go in and these two stay on the verandah. Can’t risk newborns with children’s germs.

“I’ll be quick.”

“Don’t worry Mum. We’ll play hopscotch in the shadows.”

Unobserved the figure watched from the shadows of the red bench, approaching the verandah when the adults had gone.

“I’ll show you the baby.”

“But the germs.”

“You ain’t got germs.” Trusting they followed, fulfilling the cycle of life and death.

In response to Friday Fictioneers. The photo is the PROMPT. Where does it take you? Tell me in a hundred words or less.

View original