More Mid May Flowers

fictionfitz:

always good, welcome to spring NH

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Johnny Jump Ups

Cheery little Johnny jump ups (Viola cornuta) have done just that; it seems like one day they weren’t there and the next day they were. The unusual spring heat is causing some plants to bloom two weeks or more ahead of when they normally do and it has been hard to keep up with them.

2. Painted Trillium

I was surprised to see a painted trillium (Trillium undulatum) already past its prime. You can see how the bright white has gone out of the petals and how they have become translucent. These are sure signs of age even though it should be just starting to bloom. Each white petal has a pink V at its base and that’s how it comes by its common name. Painted trilliums grow north to Ontario and south to northern Georgia. They also travel west to Michigan and east to Nova Scotia. I hope…

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Into the Land of Ice and Stone

fictionfitz:

It is where I live.

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Trail

If you’re tired of all things winter then this post isn’t for you because it’s about being in a freezer of sorts; a man made canyon blasted out of solid rock where seeping groundwater freezes into icicles that grow to the height and diameter of tree trunks. I visited this place last week because I thought that, since this was just about the coldest February that we had ever seen, I’d be able to see some big ice. I wasn’t disappointed.

2. Green Ice

I think this is the biggest “icicle” that I’ve ever seen. It had to have been 15-20 feet out from the rock face and 40-50 feet tall. It is the sweetheart of the ice climbers who come here and, if you look carefully at the very top of the photo, you can see the legs of two ice climbers dressed in blue who were tying off their ropes, preparing to…

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Bird Feeder…

fictionfitz:

Hadden’ s haven

Originally posted on John Hadden Photography:

The barred owl came to visit again! The barred owl came to visit again!

Our pal the barred owl was back yesterday afternoon, making himself (herself?) very comfortable on the top of our feeder stand for a good two hours. He seemed to be most interested in the goings on right below the feeder, no doubt waiting for a juicy mouse or other rodent to make its appearance. At times it looked like he was napping. Interestingly, none of the little birds seemed to mind too much that he was there, as the chickadees, titmice, nuthatches, and even cardinals happily munched at our other feeders just a few feet away from the owl.

Nikon D600, Sigma 120-400mm lens @ 330mm, ISO 1250, f/5.6, 1/200″ exposure.

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Friday Fictioneers: Life Cycle

fictionfitz:

Great picture Irene, writing too.

Originally posted on Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist):

© © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

“Children can’t come in.” The woman in uniform crossed her arms as she barred the entrance. 

“But Matron, we’ve driven over a hundred miles to  see the baby.”

“You go in and these two stay on the verandah. Can’t risk newborns with children’s germs.

“I’ll be quick.”

“Don’t worry Mum. We’ll play hopscotch in the shadows.”

Unobserved the figure watched from the shadows of the red bench, approaching the verandah when the adults had gone.

“I’ll show you the baby.”

“But the germs.”

“You ain’t got germs.” Trusting they followed, fulfilling the cycle of life and death.

In response to Friday Fictioneers. The photo is the PROMPT. Where does it take you? Tell me in a hundred words or less.

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Winter Scenery

fictionfitz:

Great pictures and love the quote at the end. My wife’s from California. And don’t forget that Florida has hurricanes and Arizona heat.

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Backyard

There’s a high pressure system sitting and spinning in Canada that’s dragging down bitter cold air and one snowstorm after another, sometimes as many as three in a single week. With nothing but cold weather between the storms the snow doesn’t melt but instead just builds up. I tried taking a photo of the trees in my backyard during one storm. Judging by the blurry spot on the right one of the flakes landed on my lens, but I didn’t see it until just now. I never have great luck taking photos when it’s snowing but I wanted to try to show you what it was like.

2. Snow Depth

I didn’t realize I had cropped this photo so the yardstick said “the finest pain” but it fit so I left it that way. Actually, I don’t know if I could call the pains I have from shoveling my roof “the finest,” but…

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And, it was quiet

fictionfitz:

What to do on a snow day

Originally posted on Live & Learn:

coat-rain-fashion

Excerpts from Paul Jarvis’ commentary titled Why You Should Take A Social Media Sabbatical:

One of my clients told me that social media sabbaticals are the new treks through Nepal. Taking a social media sabbatical is trendy, takes some courage, and for most westerners, it’s outside the realm of possibility. But (thankfully for me), it doesn’t require as much physical fitness as a hiking the Himalayas…

When all the small gaps in our days are filled with refreshing or sharing, there’s no room left to just sit and breathe and let whatever thoughts that want to happen… just happen. There are more ideas—not fewer—when you remove noise…

There is no longer space in our lives. We can’t wait in line without getting on our phones. Or sit on a bus. Or eat. Or wake up. Or wait for an elevator. Or watch a sunset…

Extra, dangling seconds force most…

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Shopping for Nature

fictionfitz:

One of my favorite walking spots, but not in winter. Interesting to read about and see in my off season

Originally posted on New Hampshire Garden Solutions:

1. Storefronts

In 2003 bulldozers and dump trucks moved onto a local wetland and began tearing it up. After two years had passed what was left was a sprawling 70 acre suburban eyesore, and any trace of what was once a natural wetland was gone. Or so I thought. I’ve been keeping an eye on this place since it was built just to see what kind of an impact it would have on the natural surroundings and I’ve been surprised again and again.

2. Pond

When they built the shopping center they also built a retention basin to manage runoff and hopefully improve the quality of the water that makes it into the Ashuelot River and from there ultimately to the Atlantic Ocean. Retention basins are described as “artificial lakes with vegetation around the perimeter which include a permanent pool of water in their design.”  This is more of a pond than a lake…

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